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  #1  
Old 03-02-19, 05:26 AM
mildadhd mildadhd is offline
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Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

What does "Affective", in Seasonal "Affective" Disorder mean?

What is "Affective"?









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Old 03-02-19, 05:30 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

My understanding is it means that the seasons affect people with the disorder's emotions
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Old 03-02-19, 11:37 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

af·fec·tive
adjective
PSYCHOLOGY
relating to moods, feelings, and attitudes.

Means that the season (usually but not always winter) affects the person's moods.

But I doubt you're really interested in seasonal affective disorder except as it
relates to your pet topic.
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Old 03-04-19, 02:55 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lunacie View Post
af·fec·tive
adjective
PSYCHOLOGY
relating to moods, feelings, and attitudes.

Means that the season (usually but not always winter) affects the person's moods.

The season affects affective moods and feelings?

Why does the season affect the affective functions' of some people more than others?




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Last edited by mildadhd; 03-04-19 at 03:09 AM..
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Old 03-04-19, 11:25 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Quote:
Originally Posted by mildadhd View Post
The season affects affective moods and feelings?

Why does the season affect the affective functions' of some people more than others?




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What causes SAD?

Researchers have yet to uncover the specific cause for SAD. We do know however, that several factors are at play. The reduction in sunlight in winter can throw your biological clock out of whack and reduce levels of serotonin (a brain chemical that regulates your mood) and melatonin (a chemical which regulates sleep and mood).

If you are young and female, you are also at increased risk for SAD. People who live farther from the equator or have a family history of depression also experience the symptoms more frequently.

copied from psycom dot net (cannot link because they are supported by ads)

The minute this switches to "top down/bottom up" etc, I'm outta here.
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  #6  
Old 03-04-19, 06:09 PM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Although it is popularly thought of as a winter or cold months issue, season changes and other seasons can be issues for some people.

Here's a link (hope I did this right) to a questionnaire you can fill out and take to appointments if you'd like. The validity of the instrument is questioned by some, but I find it pretty useful.

https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/access/con...PAQ%20form.doc
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Old 03-04-19, 09:04 PM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Quote:
Originally Posted by LeighWolf View Post
Although it is popularly thought of as a winter or cold months issue, season changes and other seasons can be issues for some people.

Here's a link (hope I did this right) to a questionnaire you can fill out and take to appointments if you'd like. The validity of the instrument is questioned by some, but I find it pretty useful.

https://weblearn.ox.ac.uk/access/con...PAQ%20form.doc
Maybe that questionnaire would have been helpful the first time I tried to talk
to my doc about SAD 40 years ago. He pooh-poohed the issue, telling me I was
depressed because my birthday was coming up in November.

I was going to be 29. Not the first time he was an idiot.

I told him then, and many times after, that I didn't care about my age. The only
number I didn't like to talk about was my weight.

The depression would begin in mid August, 3 months before my birthday, and
build until spring finally showed the first green buds and blades of grass and
the first robins showed up.

About 15 years ago I really began to understand the turning of the seasons,
and when I'd start to feeling depressed I'd remind myself it was because the
days were starting to get shorter, it was getting dark a few minutes earlier
every night ... and that in a few months the days would start getting longer
again, and I could start watching for those first signs of spring. I don't get
nearly as depressed since that realization.
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  #8  
Old 03-05-19, 02:04 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Oh well 29, yeah...clearly that was the issue. Every year?

SAD is well researched. Sure, there are those who don't believe in it, but a great many more people do than don't. It doesn't take long in the field to see it, either. Summer fades and moods take a downturn. Some mania in the fall and holiday season, then gradual improvement in depression in the spring and manias and mixed states blossom. Even people without SAD tend to have these subtle shifts. More people die in winter, too, so there will be more anniversaries of grief to cause depressive worsening or relapse. Or holidays without loved ones, money or a job.

I wonder if he just didn't like that you were right about something. Especially if it wasn't the first time.
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Old 03-05-19, 03:01 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Quote:
The primary function of the pineal gland is to produce melatonin.

Melatonin has various functions in the central nervous system, the most important of which is to help modulate sleep patterns.

Melatonin production is stimulated by darkness and inhibited by light.[27][28]

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineal_gland
The pineal gland produces melatonin?

Light inhibits production of melatonin and darkness stimulates production of melatonin?


Quote:
The pineal gland is a small endocrine gland in the brain of animals with backbones.

The pineal gland produces melatonin, a serotonin-derived hormone which modulates sleep patterns in both circadian and seasonal cycles.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pineal_gland
Melatonin is a "serotonin-derived hormone"?






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Old 03-05-19, 03:39 AM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Question

If darkness promote production of melatonin, why would we take melatonin when days are darker longer?

(I am not disputing that changes in seasons affect my affective moods/feelings)

But thinking about this... I would have thought that when days are darker longer, more light (a melatonin inhibitor) and less melatonin would be better?

What am I missing?






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Old 03-05-19, 03:06 PM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Quote:
Originally Posted by mildadhd View Post
But thinking about this... I would have thought that when days are darker longer, more light (a melatonin inhibitor) and less melatonin would be better?

What am I missing?
I don't think you're missing anything.

One of the treatments for SAD is the use of a light box in the mornings. Exposure to particular frequencies/wavelengths of light in the blue part of the spectrum seems to be key.

The timing of light exposure is also important.

If you are exposed to (especially blue wavelengths of) light late in the day it can throw off your circadian rhythms. (Some apps will also restrict these wavelengths of light from your phone or computer screen depending on time of day.)

Some people may take melatonin only seasonally.

Because people's responses to seasonal change vary, because people have different daily schedules, because some people are naturally more night-owls vs. larks, because some people have difficulty settling down at night, etc., some people may also take melatonin year-round.
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Old 03-05-19, 04:09 PM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

...Or it could be more complicated than I first gave it credit for (as things so often are)!:

Emens JS, Burgess HJ. Effect of Light and Melatonin and Other Melatonin Receptor Agonists on Human Circadian Physiology. Sleep Med Clin. 2015;10(4):435-53.

Lam RW, Levitan RD. Pathophysiology of seasonal affective disorder: a review. J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2000;25(5):469-80.

Adamsson M, Laike T, Morita T. Annual variation in daily light exposure and circadian change of melatonin and cortisol concentrations at a northern latitude with large seasonal differences in photoperiod length. J Physiol Anthropol. 2016;36(1):6. Published 2016 Jul 19. doi:10.1186/s40101-016-0103-9

(etc.)

(Note: These are probably not the best-representative papers, but they were a few freely-available ones found on the first couple of pages of a cursory PubMed search, and they give a flavor of some of the things that come into play when studying melatonin and SAD.)
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Old 03-05-19, 09:15 PM
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Re: Seasonal "Affective" Disorder

Also, with less sun equals less Vitamin D production. Low D may also be a significant contributing factor imo.
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