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  #1  
Old 10-22-06, 07:28 PM
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should you tell colleges you have ADD?

My nephew has the inattentive type of ADD and he's been diagnosed with a learning disability. However, he did really, really well on his SATs. So much so that it's possible that admission officers would see a big disparity between his grades and his SAT scores.

So, should he reveal his ADD/LD when he applies for colleges?

Will that help or hurt him?

Have any of you done this? Did it work out or no?

Thanks very much for your help.
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Old 10-22-06, 09:04 PM
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Neither, really. What will help is if you disclose your ADHD and then ask them what accomodations they can make for people with ADHD.

Typically it involves extra time for tests or being allowed to take tests in a quiet aera , away from distractions.


I was undiagnosed in college, but I wish I had been, because I would have done a lot better if my adhd were treated. As it was, I did okay, but I had to work a lot harder than everybody else to get good grades.

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Old 10-22-06, 10:12 PM
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ADD is not usually a stigma in college! You are just the way your are-and you are accepted. ADD is no big deal! Making excuses for any reason is!

I got my MSED before my dx and the accommodations would have saved me hours of study time! I got a 4.0, but put in inordinate hours doing papers and other homework.

Contact the disability office and make an appointment or at least talk to them to see what you need to document the ADD! Then use every accommodation provided! If I ever went back to school I would not hesitate to "out" my ADD-and get the accommodations. I would like to have a life outside of school!

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Old 10-23-06, 02:34 PM
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I chose not to disclose my ADHD with the University. Though, I worked three times as hard to get As and Bs I got it done. This year I was diagnosed and I've found simply working with a psychologist and finding Ritalin helpful I'm not having to work three times as hard anymore
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Old 10-31-06, 11:02 PM
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Thanks for the insight. At this point he hasn't applied to colleges. I'm wondering if it would be beneficial to tell colleges in the application somehow, or would you advise against it. Again, there's a big disparity between his excellent SAT scores and his grades. I'm concerned that this might exclude him from certain colleges, unless an explanation was given....or do you think this would hinder him? Or maybe does he just say a learning disability...(which he has been diagnosed with, along with the ADD--inattentive type). He's going to need financial aid. His mom died when he was 12. And his father is the sole breadwinner, but he's also got an older sister who pretty severely autistic, so that limits a lot of things for the family. Are there any scholarships available for those with learning disabilities, ADD or autistic siblings? Any advice would be greatly, greatly appreciated. He's feeling really overwhelmed by the whole college application thing.
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Old 11-18-06, 12:58 PM
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I think you should let the college know if you are applying that you have add right from the start. I made sure to put it on all of my college applications so that I could get my disability support services at the very start of college...
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Old 12-16-06, 02:05 PM
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As with employment, i would disclose after hiring/admission.

Once admitted, register for Disability Services at the school.

NB In disclosing beforehand: he will always wonder, "did i get in b/c i disclosed?" (preferential treatment), or, "did i get rejected b/c i disclosed?" (discriminatory treatment). I think it could backfire either way.
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Old 01-22-07, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QueensU_girl
As with employment, i would disclose after hiring/admission.

Once admitted, register for Disability Services at the school.

NB In disclosing beforehand: he will always wonder, "did i get in b/c i disclosed?" (preferential treatment), or, "did i get rejected b/c i disclosed?" (discriminatory treatment). I think it could backfire either way.
I totally agree this way they cannot discriminate pre-acceptance. I've found that the technical college in my area makes their services well known and availible for those with disabilities. I think in the 4-year college I'm in it is kept more discreet. If I could go back on it I would have registered immediately after the first semester. I have failed to many classes and it's taken me far to long to get to this point. I'm much to stubborn to ask for help. Now that I'm not on Adderall anymore I NEED to ask for help.
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Old 01-22-07, 05:34 PM
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Hi addpodcast,
Please allow me to give you my story.
I was not diagnosed severly ADD until age 48. I have a very high IQ. I did great on my SAT's. I did terrible in school. I followed a girl to college, where I applied in March for September. I got in. My first 2 years, my average was 2.5. In my junior year, I began drinking 1/2 fifth of Smirnoff Martini Vodka. I was drunk for my last 2 years. Upon graduation (yes, I graduated), my 4 year grade average was 3.2, and my degree was Dean's List.
I say all of this to beg you: Let everyone know that your nephew is ADD. Let him seek a hands-on or visual career. Tell your nephew to be proud of how God made him. He is custom made for certain (great paying) creative careers.
In this day and age, there should be no need for "self" medication.
Bill

Last edited by billtruran; 01-22-07 at 05:36 PM.. Reason: correction
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Old 01-22-07, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billtruran
Let him seek a hands-on or visual career. Tell your nephew to be proud of how God made him. He is custom made for certain (great paying) creative careers.

Bill
Great post Bill. One small tweak however -- visual and hands on are my weakest areas (although for many ADDers they are strengths). My strengths are actually in the verbal arena (my verbal IQ is 24 points higher than my performance IQ). I also graduated from college and two masters programs untreated. Finding your strength and your passion is important for anyone, but absolutely essential for an ADDer or there isn't much way they can keep their focus on their goal. Assessment to find one's strengths can be very helpful -- in the career testing I had the two top careers they recommended (teaching and counseling) were where I ended up and I loved it!


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Old 01-23-07, 01:59 AM
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I choosed to keep silent about my LD / ADD to admissions. I did not want to be be stigmitized by it. Though I still had talked to the disability support office before applying, just saying I was a perspective student, but admissions never was informed. I was an honors student throughout most of high school with moderatley above average SAT scores. I mostly remained silent about my LD / ADD when applying to college because I had often been misjudged and my potential abilities undervalued after revealing my diagnosis. My IQ scores have dropped 30 points since I was twelve, for the older one is the more important time and speed are on IQ tests. The importance of timed tasks brought down my scores, because of my LD I have a severe processing delay. It was extremely difficult to for me to get into a private prep school during my softmore year of high school because of my neuropsych testing, despite my grades. However, once I was admitted I did not hesitate using and requesting any accomodations I needed, or from speaking opening about my LD / ADD to teachers or other students. I am also always in the disability directors office within the first two days of each new semester and and have tutoring 4 times a week (at no extra cost, including 1x a week with a learning disability specialist.) My college's LD director is one of the most informed specialists I encountered at any college disability officeand is very support, almost everything I need or ask for is fulfilled. This is also partially to because I advocate for myself, work hard, keep my grades up (3.9 G.P.A, honors program, deans list) have the LD director's respect. In many ways she had become of a main advisor (seeking her advice on class schedules and specific professors' teaching styles) so much more than my assigned general or major advisor.

I found that is was extemely important to talk to the disability office before applying or committing to a school. It gives you a chance to not only meet the staff you would be working with, but also may teach you a lot about the schools general attitudes, beliefs, and expectations. Not all schools, despite whatever the laws are offer the same amount of support services or are as willing to help you when needed. My impressions of the LD director and the disability office was a major determinate for which schools I applied to and in deciding on I one final one I now attend. And never once was the admission staff informed or given access to my neuropsych testing, nor did I hand it over the first time I met with the LD director.

As far as disability scholarships and financial aid ncld.org does have a 10,000 (2,500 a year) scholarship, called the Anne Ford scholarship for graduating high school seniors. Also, it may be worth contacting your local state rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities. They often may pay for tuition to a state school, along with books, and transporaton (like bus or train passes). I just got the books and transporation, and an occasional summer class, because I chose I private college. My local state schools (5000+) were too big, compared to my college of 1200 students.
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Old 01-23-07, 11:30 AM
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I didn't want to but I failed a test due to the constant traffic of annoying people into this computer lab and I had to do it... a 53 isn't a reflection of an Honor Roll student, I did meet with the accomodation lady but didn't need it "played it by ear" and got to retake it in a quiet setting and aced it.
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Old 07-20-08, 08:46 PM
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Re: should you tell colleges you have ADD?

We have the exact same situation with our son, 98% standardized tests, low GPA, hard classes, doesn't care about grades! He is about to start his college applications. Your post is older, but perhaps someone else will need this info.

From what I can tell it is helpful in this situation to address the disability directly with the school. Of course this depends upon the school, but many excellent schools, like UCLA, have specialty programs to support disabled students, including students with ADHD and LD, and like to have students address how they have overcome obstacles within their personal statements.

If an LD student has a high GPA and high standardized test scores then depending on the target school, supressing the dx during application may be the right strategy, and is totally a students right. One should check with a particular school that recieving accomodations won't be percluded if the student don't disclose before applying. Especially if the student needs or wants the accomodations in college.

The Princeton Review publishes a compendium of schools who have good adhd/ld support -- and address whether to disclose during the application process or afterward and how to do it. The Fiske Guild also has a section listing colleges that have good disabled student support and note that this segment of college specialization is the most rapidly growing.

Another book that might be helpful is Guiding Teens with Learning Disabilities -- navigating the transition from high school to adulthood...
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