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  #1  
Old 10-23-08, 12:06 AM
matsuiny2004 matsuiny2004 is offline
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ADHD rights movement?

Are there other people on this site that would like a neurodiversity view of ADHD?
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  #2  
Old 10-23-08, 02:19 PM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

What rights are you looking for?
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Old 10-23-08, 06:19 PM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

I have always felt a sense of alienation in social environments, in school, and at work because of my behavior due to ADHD.

I believe that better awareness and a stricter form of diagnosis would certainly help people, especially those who have gone overlooked for too long.

I am currently trying to work with my school advisors and councelors in hopes that my professors will cut me some slack until my ADHD and depression are fully treated.

However, it's extremely common for people to blame ADD or ADHD for their faults, and jokingly use it to explain their behavior. These are the people who do not have ADHD. This also applies to college students who abuse Adderall to study for exams.

I would personally love to be a part of an ADHD awareness group. It is a much more serious condition than people make it out to be.

- Glen
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Old 10-26-08, 04:18 AM
matsuiny2004 matsuiny2004 is offline
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

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Originally Posted by blueroo View Post
What rights are you looking for?
I think they should see that there are strengths in ADHDers and that we can improve are weaknesses, but that does not mean we are cured. Michael phelps is an olympic swimmer and he does not even take ritalin. There are many usefull traits. We have our challenges other people do too, but can we have our strenghts and contributions recognized as well and maybe more than the weaknesses?
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Old 10-26-08, 04:20 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GL3NE View Post
I have always felt a sense of alienation in social environments, in school, and at work because of my behavior due to ADHD.

I believe that better awareness and a stricter form of diagnosis would certainly help people, especially those who have gone overlooked for too long.

I am currently trying to work with my school advisors and councelors in hopes that my professors will cut me some slack until my ADHD and depression are fully treated.

However, it's extremely common for people to blame ADD or ADHD for their faults, and jokingly use it to explain their behavior. These are the people who do not have ADHD. This also applies to college students who abuse Adderall to study for exams.

I would personally love to be a part of an ADHD awareness group. It is a much more serious condition than people make it out to be.

- Glen
I think the stigma is another part. It is some assumed that needing help is bad and that there is something wrong with you for needing it. It is like behaving differently makes you defective.
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Old 10-27-08, 12:52 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

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Originally Posted by matsuiny2004 View Post
I think they should see that there are strengths in ADHDers and that we can improve are weaknesses, but that does not mean we are cured. Michael phelps is an olympic swimmer and he does not even take ritalin. There are many usefull traits. We have our challenges other people do too, but can we have our strenghts and contributions recognized as well and maybe more than the weaknesses?
This all sounds great, but it doesn't have much to do with rights. What is your goal? What rights need to be protected?
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Old 10-28-08, 01:56 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

I think this is long overdue. Even though ADHD is protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act there is still a tremendous amount of obstacles left to overcome. I fully support your concept of a neurodiversity movement. The concept of normalcy is far to ostracizing, and it hurts many people. I blame the idea of "normal" in part for the overdiagnosis in children.

As I have said before, I am studying to be a pyschologist. I believe my colleagues are blind to the concept of neurodiversity as ironic as might seem. The logic seems to be that even though human beings are different, the brain somehow must be mostly the same just like most people have two arms and two legs, etc.

What I believe is still ahead of all of us is the battle to educate the public. Howie Mandel for example has started to make it known to the public (at least in the states) how many people may have ADD/ADHD. The public service announcement states that nearly ten million people in america may have ADD/ADHD. (The number is taken from a 4.4% assumed rate of the population)

What I have found to be the case recently in fighting my own battles for my rights is that its difficult to really protect your own rights. For example, if you learn about the ADA its illegal to fire someone for something related to their disability, such as missing deadlines in the case of ADHD. Now the tricky part is that you first have to be diagnosed with ADD/ADHD before you are hired and tell your employer before they agreed to hire you. If they agree to hire you then they cant fire you for it.

This is problematic because it forces a person to reveal their personal psychological status, much like a person with AIDS being legally forced to disclose their status. While the law may protect a person technically, its VERY difficult to prove the law in your favor when your fired. Also, its VERY difficult to get hired because of the stigmas people still have in regards to ADD. Most people think it just means you can't pay attention or finish tasks. Most people dont understand the intricate complexities of neurological disorders such as ADD, which by all means most psychologists dont even understand.

So, bringing myself back to my point. YES, we need to fight for neurodiversity. Having ADD doesn't mean that we can't do a job or that we are disabled in a bad way, it means we are DIFFERENT.

We need to start educating the general public about what ADD really is and how it affects each person in a different way. That to me is a very important task that I look forward to fighting my entire career.

*exhale*

Ok, comments?
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Old 10-28-08, 02:47 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

Quote:
Are there other people on this site that would like a neurodiversity view of ADHD?

matsuiny2004 People on this site have access to a neurodiversity view as well as a main stream view members even have access to perspectives that believe having ADD means we are one step up in the evolutionary ladder . Individuals are allowed to see their ADD in what ever manner they so choose.


Perspective is some thing people decide to have it is by no means some thing that should be forced up on any one.

A few years back myself and some other members had several long drawn out debate threads with members of main stream "ADD disorder" point of view who felt we should be silenced

What emerged is the ADDF we have now - where some see ADD as a disorder some as a gift and others as a neurodiversity Periodically discussions get passionate but no longer is one group trying to silence the other.

All perspectives enjoy equal rights to their expression under identical guidelines.

Personally I do not have a strict neurodiverse point of view I have a modified neurodiverse perspective. I believe in medication if the individual needs it to function in this society.


I do how ever believe that despite the availability of medication that diversity tolerance should be a social goal. I am starting this movement beginning with myself.
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  #9  
Old 10-28-08, 06:13 PM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

Finally, a thread I may have something to contribute to! I spent the summer as a research assistant, studying the effects of recent disability rights legislation in the Netherlands. The experience opened my eyes to disability as an identity issue, and I fully intend to do whatever I can to finally get Disability Studies off the ground in this country.

First of all, Black Razor, where did you get your information on disclosure? As I understand it, if there is no need for accommodations during the application and interviewing process, applicants are not required to disclose at all. I believe it is actually illegal for an employer to inquire about disabilities directly.

Matsuiny2004 makes a very good point when he observes that "it is like behaving differently makes you defective." That's how the dynamic between majorities or dominant groups and minorities or marginalised groups generally works. The trick is to get people to acknowledge that divergence from the norm does NOT entail inferiority, and that attempts at assimilating the "different" individual to make him or her "normal" are NOT the way to go.

The first step is a change of perspective. Think of a web site, for instance, that has important information on it, and a flashy layout that makes it incompatible with software that converts text to sound or braille. Now, think of someone who needs the information on that website, and who happens to have a visual disability. Very few people would consider the user's disability to be the problem here; it's the website that is inaccessible to a specific group of users.

That's the perspective we need: when standard procedure does not work for a certain type of person, this means the standard simply does not work for everyone it's supposed to work for. It's standard procedure, then, that needs to be adjusted, not the individual that it cannot accommodate.

As I've posted elsewhere on this board, the prevalence rate of 4-5% means that in a given group of 20 to 25 people (an office department, a class), there's likely to be only one person with AD/HD. The key to disability rights in our case, I believe, is to create an awareness of the fact that yes, we may only be a small minority, but we're a valid alternative to what is generally considered to be the norm.

We have a right to be part of society, just the way we are. A society that does not have room for everyone is simply not big enough.
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Old 10-29-08, 04:48 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

Again, this is all well and good.

But what exactly do you want to change? Are you simply advocating for more ADHD awareness? Special rules for people with ADHD? What?
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Old 10-29-08, 10:49 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

I believe in stricter guidelines in the testing to diagnosis someone with ADHD. I went through an entire day of intense testing before any treatments were considered, and I hear about college students just going to the college medical department and saying "I have trouble concentrating" and they get scripts for medication! That makes me a little upset. I would really like to see stricter guidelines.
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Old 10-30-08, 04:59 PM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ferdinan View Post
I believe in stricter guidelines in the testing to diagnosis someone with ADHD. I went through an entire day of intense testing before any treatments were considered, and I hear about college students just going to the college medical department and saying "I have trouble concentrating" and they get scripts for medication! That makes me a little upset. I would really like to see stricter guidelines.
I agree 100%. Especially as someone studying to be a mental health professional. ADD diagnosis is too varying, the American Medical Association can't even agree on a diagnosis criteria. I'm not saying it would be easy, but I agree that there should be more than just a visit to some clinic before getting diagnosed. ADHD is not to be taken lightly, it can cripple someone, and worse students that do this cause rampant inflation of research statistics and give us a bad name.
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Old 10-31-08, 03:51 PM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

1) Please show the numbers that prove "rampant inflation" of statistics.

2) What is this "bad name" you are referring to? How is it hurting us?
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Old 11-02-08, 06:44 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

I am realizing that it is more a change in perspective of how ADHD is seen that I want to change, not the actual laws. I do wish their was a right to be differnt or diverge from the norm. I am so tired of the hype people put into a child being impulsive, having difficutly concentrating, daydreaming, etc. Many of those traits can be positive depending on the context, but in a rigid school environment that is most likeley the case. The UK is much further ahead than the US in terms of learning difficulties/differences. The have governemnt run campaign on the acceptance of learning difficulties. In the US it hard to even be seen as different. There are plenty of studies and experiments that show we are completely capable of learning and being successful. We can use are strenghts and oddites to help towards that success. I ahve even found a way to make mundane chores more appealing to ADHDers like me. One was to create a randomly timed schedule so I would have to do a chore in certain day, but the time I would be given was random each day. I came up with other alternative methods such as turning chores into a game an example would be trying to do the dishes as fast as possibly can, and at other time using my chores as excercise to stimulate my creativity. I have even found studies that say ADHDers can improve their abilites and weakenesses by taking fishoilds (omega 3's) which the study says are actually supposed to help people in general regardless of ADHD diagnosis or not and excercise which I already mentioned. Those both helped average children and ADHDers. Alhtough there are no guarantess for all cases it is worth trying. As far as actual diagnosis goes I think it should be done by brain scan since behavior can be very subjective and it has been shown by harvard students that if provoked in certain ways an animal can behave however it pleases. I think brain scans would definetly cut back the overdiagnosis, creation, and underdiagnosis of certain conditons including ADHD.
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Old 11-02-08, 06:45 AM
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Re: ADHD rights movement?

As for what psychiatry can do to change I think it should learn from postpsychiatry which puts much more emphasis on social and cultural contexts than sysmptoms and behavior.

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/322/7288/724

I learned in my anthropology class that there are many different ways structuring a society besides hierarchy. There is heterarchy, responsible autonomy, and holarchy as far as I know. Heterarchies are simmilar to the social structure hunter gather cultures used to use. They are more helpful for organizations or people that want focus more on innovation and creativity and not have to worry about money and class status.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heterarchy
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